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Sermon Podcasts
You Are Your Best Argument
July 20, 2014  |  19:30  |  4.7 MB
Right-Click Here to Download MP3

Apostolic Astonishment
July 13, 2014  |  21:51  |  5.3 MB
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Whom Do We Love the Most?
July 6, 2014  |  23:46  |  5.7 MB
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The Founding of America
June 29, 2014  |  18:56  |  4.6 MB
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God is Enough.
Then. Now. Forever.

June 22, 2014  |  27:13  |  6.5 MB
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Go and Do What?
June 15, 2014  |  24:35  |  5.9 MB
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The Future May Be Near II
June 8, 2014  |  24:58  |  6.0 MB
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Sermon Archives ...

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Welcome to pilotknob.org ...
Thanks for visiting. We’re excited about what pilotknob.org can offer to both members of Pilot Knob Lutheran and the surrounding community. There are many churches in the North Iowa area, each with its unique ability of serving in the Body of Christ. We pray you find the congregation God has chosen for you to serve.

We encourage you to not only take a look around, but also tell us about your visit: how you use the web site, and what you’d like to see added to pilotknob.org. We desire to be a resource for the Christian and non-Christian alike. Thank you, and may God enrich your day.

We hope you’ll visit us in person, too! We’re a short drive from numerous communities: Forest City, Fertile, Hanlontown and Joice, Iowa.

Rev. Robert Snitzer Rev. Robert Snitzer
pastorbob@pilotknob.org

Listen to the Sunday message on KIOW
107.3 FM at 7:00 a.m. every Sunday

Tell a friend, or tune in if you miss a service.

Born to be Mild? I was sitting in a waiting room for our van to be repaired when my eye caught the cover of the Smithsonian magazine. It was the picture of a toddler in diapers with red horns coming out of his head and a red pitch fork in his hand. The title was: “Born To Be Mild.” The article was asking an important age-old question of where morality comes from. Naturally it grabbed my interest and I had to borrow the magazine.

Yale University has what is called an infant cognition center where researchers study the moral inclinations (behavior) of infants: How do they understand right from wrong before language and culture influences them? As I read I encountered the underlying assumption or presupposition I anticipated. Words and phrases such as, “are we a failed species ... Charles Darwin wrote ... Benjamin Spock ... the evolution of childhood ... the evolutionary road ... natural selection ... in our evolution,” to name a few. Yes, it was a purely-evolutionary presupposition. To put it simply, researchers are trying to understand human behavior without God as part of the equation. What is interesting is evolutionists will acknowledge the morals most people adhere to, which has their basis in the Bible, but will not acknowledge God as the great, moral law giver. In fact many evolutionists acknowledge evolution does not provide a basis for morality. So how does one determine good from evil, right and wrong, without a foundation defining what is good and evil? How can one say something is evil without a standard of good to compare it to?

So where does morality come from? We must begin with our Christian presupposition that God exists. He is the creator and man alone is created in his image and, as our creator, has the right to set the standards for morality. Man (Adam & Eve) were created with the understanding of what was good and the choice to obey their creator or to rebel against him. Man has not lost his sense of right and wrong, which we normally call a conscience. That is why researchers at Yale observe infants and toddlers often making choices that are good and right.

The Bible makes it clear our moral standard comes from the law of God given in the Ten Commandments, and they are written on every human heart.

“Indeed, when Gentiles, who do not have the law, do by nature things required by the law, they are a law for themselves, even though they do not have the law. They show that the requirements of the law are written on their hearts, their consciences also bearing witness, and their thoughts sometimes accusing them and at other times even defending them. This will take place on the day when God judges people’s secrets through Jesus Christ, as my gospel declares.&rdquo
 —Romans 2:14-16
However, those who study human behavior without the lens of scripture fail to take into account our sin nature, which in turn caused us to ignore our moral inclinations (conscience) or to follow our appetite for sin. Our sin nature when followed can leave our conscience marred and even seared.
“Such teachings come through hypocritical liars, whose consciences have been seared as with a hot iron.”
 —I Timothy 4:2
See also Romans 1:18-28.

Because of our sin nature, our perception of right and wrong is an imperfect guide to morality. Therefore, we are in need of God’s direction and that comes to us through his word which is the ultimate foundation for knowing good and evil. We need only to look at the Bible to understand the origin of morality and why some people choose evil. The God of the Bible has provided a universal standard of morality and it is summed up in Micah:

“He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”
 —Micah 6:8
“‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’”
 —Matthew 22:37-39

Without Christianity there is no lasting or universal right and wrong. The Bible must be taught to our children and grandchildren.

Have you given your life to the creator?

 —Pastor Bob

 



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